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Old May 6th, 2011, 05:16 PM
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flyingwind flyingwind is offline
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Default inheritable gambling debt?

Is gambling debt inheritable?

If you rack up 5 million in gambling debt, your estate is too small to pay for the debt (and your bankroll was demolished when you overbet the bankroll) , and on top of that you die. Does your spouse suddenly have 5 million in gambling debt?

Assume your spouse is deceased. Do your children inherit your gambling debt?
  #2  
Old May 6th, 2011, 09:06 PM
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zengrifter zengrifter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwind View Post
Is gambling debt inheritable?

If you rack up 5 million in gambling debt, your estate is too small to pay for the debt (and your bankroll was demolished when you overbet the bankroll) , and on top of that you die. Does your spouse suddenly have 5 million in gambling debt?

Assume your spouse is deceased. Do your children inherit your gambling debt?
Maybe, it is a bad check, right? zg
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Old May 7th, 2011, 03:33 AM
johndoe johndoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwind View Post
Is gambling debt inheritable?

If you rack up 5 million in gambling debt, your estate is too small to pay for the debt (and your bankroll was demolished when you overbet the bankroll) , and on top of that you die. Does your spouse suddenly have 5 million in gambling debt?

Assume your spouse is deceased. Do your children inherit your gambling debt?
I don't think any kinds of debts can be inherited, aside from those held by a corporation (which could just close).
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Old May 7th, 2011, 05:52 AM
MangoJ MangoJ is offline
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Originally Posted by johndoe View Post
I don't think any kinds of debts can be inherited, aside from those held by a corporation (which could just close).
Not sure about mortages. But in this case the house may be owned by the bank in the first place (or bundle the mortage contract with a life insurance).
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Old May 7th, 2011, 08:58 AM
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blackchipjim blackchipjim is offline
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Default Estate Debt?

If there was a will probate court procedings would determine what debt and liabilities would be settled. When a person dies it's a matter of public record and the person or et'al is really responsible to make claim against the estate. You ask a simple question with a complicated answer and alot has to be taken into account.
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Old May 7th, 2011, 09:19 AM
shadroch shadroch is offline
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Is the marker on a joint checking account? If so, the death of one person doesn't change anything.
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Old May 7th, 2011, 09:39 AM
johndoe johndoe is offline
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Originally Posted by MangoJ View Post
Not sure about mortages. But in this case the house may be owned by the bank in the first place (or bundle the mortage contract with a life insurance).
Right. In the case of a mortgage, it's just a specific kind of loan that uses the house as collateral. The owner is still the owner, and it becomes the bank's property only on default (foreclosure). If a house was inherited with a mortgage, the new owner would still have the debt of course. Though they might be able to waive ownership.

As for gambling debts, unless they're owed to an extra-legal entity (mafia!), there is no possible way for them to be inherited. They'd have to get in line with everyone else with a debt claim on the estate.
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Old May 20th, 2011, 01:35 AM
WRX WRX is offline
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Debts are never "inherited." And except in a few specialized circumstances like a debt incurred for the purpose of furnishing the common necessaries of life, the law does not saddle a married person with a spouse's debts.

A couple of caveats, though:

(1) In community property states, the entire community property interests of both spouses are subject to the enforcement of a judgment against either spouse for a debt incurred during marriage. That liability will survive the death of a spouse.

(2) In probate or similar proceedings, a process will be provided for the settlement of creditors' claims. Debts will typically have to be paid before any of the decedent's property can be distributed to survivors, by way of bequests in a will, distribution through a trust, or intestate succession, in the case of someone dying without a will. If a survivor receives property of a decedent informally, without probate or similar proceedings, he may become liable for the decedent's debts, up to the value of the property so received.

Individual circumstances could change the result, so anyone faced with an actual possibility of liability should consult legal counsel. (And if the debt was incurred to the Corleone Home Loan Co., they might have a different attitude about the whole thing.)

Last edited by WRX; May 20th, 2011 at 01:38 AM.
 

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