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Old June 30th, 2011, 07:37 PM
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If I'm in LV and get into hot water with a store, which lawyer should I call? (I think I should start keeping a phone number or contact handy)

What about other areas of the country?
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Old June 30th, 2011, 08:58 PM
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You do not need an attorney.

If you are beaten up, or detained excessively, you have plenty of time to contact an attorney to file suit.

In Las Vegas the District Attorney and the Metro Cops are in bed with the Casino Owners.

In a casino that is a Tribal enterprise you have NO rights. No attorney can help you.

The vast majority of casinos will 86' you or trespass you; and are 100% within their rights to do so.

I have had some unpleasant experiences getting trespassed, but retaining an attorney would never have been cost-effective.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 09:03 PM
tthree tthree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwind View Post
If I'm in LV and get into hot water with a store, which lawyer should I call? (I think I should start keeping a phone number or contact handy)

What about other areas of the country?
How about betting smart enough that you don't get in trouble. You won't
need a lawyer or have to find a new casino.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 09:25 PM
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zengrifter zengrifter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwind View Post
If I'm in LV and get into hot water with a store, which lawyer should I call? (I think I should start keeping a phone number or contact handy)
Robert Nersesian
528 S 8th St
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 385-5454

See also - http://www.blackjackinfo.com/bb/showthread.php?t=2439
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Old July 1st, 2011, 03:19 AM
shadroch shadroch is offline
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Having an attorney on speed dial and/or his card in your wallet can come in handy. Just the threat of getting an attorney involved often changes the situation in your favor.
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Old July 1st, 2011, 06:15 AM
FrankieT FrankieT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FLASH1296 View Post
You do not need an attorney.

If you are beaten up, or detained excessively, you have plenty of time to contact an attorney to file suit.

In Las Vegas the District Attorney and the Metro Cops are in bed with the Casino Owners.

In a casino that is a Tribal enterprise you have NO rights. No attorney can help you.

The vast majority of casinos will 86' you or trespass you; and are 100% within their rights to do so.

I have had some unpleasant experiences getting trespassed, but retaining an attorney would never have been cost-effective.

You have any examples of an AP player being cheated and not having any retribution in a dispute at an Indian Casino?

Don't even the tribal gaming commission have laws that they are supposed to follow, or do they just rubber stamp in casino's favor if any dispute arrises?

No rights at all in tribal casinos? Scary.

Last edited by FrankieT; July 1st, 2011 at 06:19 AM.
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Old July 1st, 2011, 06:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankieT View Post
You have any examples of an AP player being cheated and not having any retribution in a dispute at an Indian Casino?

Don't even the tribal gaming commission have laws that they are supposed to follow, or do they just rubber stamp in casino's favor if any dispute arrises?

No rights at all in tribal casinos? Scary.
I've read a few stories in the paper about tribes not paying out winning slot jackpots claiming malfunctions despite several eyewitnesses. Some of the tribal gaming commissions are comprised of the same crooks that run the tribe and the casino. Your best chance at any fairness is with tribal police who are bound first by US law then tribal law but who's to say they still don't favor their employer?
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Old July 1st, 2011, 06:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zengrifter View Post
Robert Nersesian
528 S 8th St
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702) 385-5454
x2. Add gaming in your phone while you're at it, 702 486-2020 for Las Vegas enforcement division.
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Old July 1st, 2011, 07:17 AM
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HockeXpert, you said,

"tribal police who are bound first by US law then tribal law"

Correction:

The tribes are NEVER bound by US Law, as they are SOVEREIGN nations.

There is a US Supreme Court Case from the 1970's where the Justices decreed that even constitutional protections (in that case "unreasonable search and seizure") do NOT apply on Indian Land.

I can post that here if there is interest.

One might note that the Seminole Casinos in Florida, according to the Florida Supreme Court's unanimous decision, are unlawful; yet their sovereignty completely protects them from Florida state law.

The single best example of Native American sovereignty that I know of was when (around 1986) New York's then Governor, Nelson Rockefeller, foolishly sent in the State Police to shut down the (then) unlawful casino operating on the Ste. Regis Reservation in northern N.Y. The Mohawks greeted the State Police with road blocks and a hail of gunfire in which some State police were wounded. The Attorney General quickly informed the governor that the State Police have no right to enforce any laws on tribal lands and that agents and officers of Federal, State, County, Municipal governments cannot so much as be present on their land without their permission.

Billboards stating that were erected on the eastern and western access roads, and were still present when last I was there.

Those signs explicitly refused access to the I.R.S. F.B.I. etc.

p.s. Federally recognized Native Americans tribes number > 550 with about 2.4 million members, who have been American citizens with voting rights since 1924. (New Mexico 1962)

State income taxes are not paid on reservation or trust lands.

"Tribal sovereignty describes the right of federally recognized tribes to govern themselves and the existence of a government-to-government relationship with the United States. Thus a tribe is not a ward of the government, but an independent nation with the right to form its own government, adjudicate legal cases within its borders, levy taxes within its borders, establish its membership, and decide its own future fate. The federal government has a trust responsibility to protect tribal lands, assets, resources and treaty rights."
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Old July 1st, 2011, 07:59 AM
johndoe johndoe is offline
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State Law does not apply to reservations, but Federal Law most certainly does.

Of course, bringing a federal jurisdiction case is not as easy, and laws are often different, but they are not "sovereign nations". They're essentially their own states.
 

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