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  #1  
Old December 7th, 2011, 07:00 PM
Baberuth Baberuth is offline
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Default A parting gift for all. The secret of sauce.

Take this to the bank. This is the secret.
Every sauce, referred to gravy in some areas is never the same, but the basics are. Mixing the crushed tomatoes with tomato sauce etc. is to your texture liking or sometimes you just like that to be different. The spices are even to your taste, but how you do your spices and when is the secret of making a real sauce.

In a large sauce pan pour in a layer of olive oil. On low heat sautť diced sweet onions and the spices you like. I suggest salt, pepper, garlic, basil and add some Italian seasoning which should be used sparingly so not to over load the sauce with oregano and other spices. The onions and garlic should go in first because the flaky spices marry to the oil fast and could burn. When the onions are almost translucent add the flaky spices. Basil should be the main spice. The spices, onions and garlic will flavor the oil. In a few minutes the onions will be translucent and the spices will have flavored the oil as well as the garlic and onions. NOW add your crushed tomatoes and tomato sauce. Adding some red wine and a little sugar to taste will take time to perfect, but that is a variable to suit yourself.

Adding spices to the sauce is a joke. The flavored oil makes the sauce. The same spices thrown into tomato sauce and crushed tomatoes would NEVER make a sauce.

Your meats need to be browned and almost cooked and drained before adding them to the pot. I will give you tips on meats to add.

Meatball recipes are all over the internet and they are to taste. Using chopped Italian bread instead of bread crumbs in the mixture is pretty good. Adding chopped onions and Parmigiano-Reggiano
will make the meatballs extra special.

Use the best sausage in town. The best costs little more than the run of the mill. Check around and you will soon find an Italian sausage that many crave. I would suggest trying different tastes like hot, hot/garlic, wine/cheese, pepper/wine, etc. The best places will have a variety.

Pork is easy. Have the butcher cut chunks of shoulder into pieces the size of an apple. The pork will be the high-light of the meats. We all crave a chunk of pork blade with our meals.

My Mom is gone, but I remember the day I brought my sweetheart on Sunday morning to my parentís home to learn about sauce. To this day I still eat my Momís sauce every Sunday and again on Monday and/or Tuesday. I hope you all have a merry Christmas and God bless you all.

Babe
  #2  
Old December 7th, 2011, 07:52 PM
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zengrifter zengrifter is offline
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Bambino, you're Italiano! Paisano!

Let me ask you... how might I alter the Mamma's gravy for my signature eggplant, Grifter Parmigiana? zg
  #3  
Old December 7th, 2011, 08:33 PM
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If you are using ground meats, as in a Bolognese, Marcella Hazan suggests cooking the meat in milk after it is browned. The milk-fat protects the beef during the long simmer. Then cook in wine. I use white, although the Southern Italians tend to use red. Then add the tomatoes, and simmer for five hours. Takes forever, and you have to constantly watch that it doesnít start boiling. But, makes a grand meal over fettucini.
  #4  
Old December 8th, 2011, 05:35 AM
Baberuth Baberuth is offline
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Default The best meals of my life happen every Sunday!

This is when your sauce has made it.

ZG, Every daughter slightly altered their Mamma's sauce, but never admitted it. Every daughter in law did the same and their husbands will say it's the best, but not in front of Mom.

I was being kicked out of college and invited the dean over for Sunday dinner so he could see what a nice boy I was. He accepted and my Mom saved me with her sauce and pasta dinner. True story.

Keep them coming. Great to hear your secrets.

Babe
  #5  
Old December 8th, 2011, 07:23 AM
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MY red sauce I am very proud of. I get a lot of requests for it. It requires a 4 to 5 hr. simmer with a lot of stirring.

Without going into details I will say that there are a couple of important points.

The base of my sauce contains PORK neck bones sautťed with chopped onions in COLAVITA Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

The tomatoes: Use only PARMA brand strained tomatoes and any large can of imported San Marzano tomatoes.

Add freshly chopped basil leaves during the last 20 to 30 minutes.

Instead of sugar use a little Heinz Ketchup.

  #6  
Old December 8th, 2011, 04:44 PM
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aslan aslan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baberuth View Post
Take this to the bank. This is the secret.
Every sauce, referred to gravy in some areas is never the same, but the basics are. Mixing the crushed tomatoes with tomato sauce etc. is to your texture liking or sometimes you just like that to be different. The spices are even to your taste, but how you do your spices and when is the secret of making a real sauce.

In a large sauce pan pour in a layer of olive oil. On low heat sautť diced sweet onions and the spices you like. I suggest salt, pepper, garlic, basil and add some Italian seasoning which should be used sparingly so not to over load the sauce with oregano and other spices. The onions and garlic should go in first because the flaky spices marry to the oil fast and could burn. When the onions are almost translucent add the flaky spices. Basil should be the main spice. The spices, onions and garlic will flavor the oil. In a few minutes the onions will be translucent and the spices will have flavored the oil as well as the garlic and onions. NOW add your crushed tomatoes and tomato sauce. Adding some red wine and a little sugar to taste will take time to perfect, but that is a variable to suit yourself.

Adding spices to the sauce is a joke. The flavored oil makes the sauce. The same spices thrown into tomato sauce and crushed tomatoes would NEVER make a sauce.

Your meats need to be browned and almost cooked and drained before adding them to the pot. I will give you tips on meats to add.

Meatball recipes are all over the internet and they are to taste. Using chopped Italian bread instead of bread crumbs in the mixture is pretty good. Adding chopped onions and Parmigiano-Reggiano
will make the meatballs extra special.

Use the best sausage in town. The best costs little more than the run of the mill. Check around and you will soon find an Italian sausage that many crave. I would suggest trying different tastes like hot, hot/garlic, wine/cheese, pepper/wine, etc. The best places will have a variety.

Pork is easy. Have the butcher cut chunks of shoulder into pieces the size of an apple. The pork will be the high-light of the meats. We all crave a chunk of pork blade with our meals.

My Mom is gone, but I remember the day I brought my sweetheart on Sunday morning to my parent’s home to learn about sauce. To this day I still eat my Mom’s sauce every Sunday and again on Monday and/or Tuesday. I hope you all have a merry Christmas and God bless you all.

Babe
I once had my Mom's sauce recipe, and I still know all the ingredients, but I have lost all the proportions. I was so in love with her Sunday afternoon spaghetti and meat balls, that I continue to try to duplicate it to this day, even though I have discovered other very good recipes along the way. Thanks for your unique insights and suggestions; I will try them all. There is nothing, nothing, nothing on earth like a good Italian sauce. Now I'm thinking of her turkey stuffing, too-- to die for!!! Too bad I'm on a strict diet at the present time, or I'd be commandeering the kitchen right about now. Man, I'm hungry!!!!!
  #7  
Old December 8th, 2011, 06:35 PM
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IMHO, the secret of a good tomato sauce is not based on proportions. As was said earlier, donít get carried away with spices. Or even herbs. I donít even use basil. Start with aromatics (what the French call mirepoix as stated in another thread). Simply onion, carrots and celery and a touch of garlic. (Shallot if you wish.) In this case, cooked very lightly and slowly, and never browned. Hazan used to say a couple tablespoons. I used a cup. She then published a newer book greatly increasing the quantities. I donít know if it was an err in the original book, or a nod to modern cooking. But, the aromatic vegs are better in tomato sauces than throwing in heavier Provence herbs (which I adore on chicken), and spices are simply not required.

Of course everyone has different tastes. I adore the Northern Italian subtleties. As well as their Ferraris, Lamborghinis and Maseratis.
  #8  
Old December 8th, 2011, 07:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QFIT View Post
As was said earlier, donít get carried away with spices. Or even herbs. I donít even use basil.
Sacrilege, blasphemy!
  #9  
Old December 8th, 2011, 09:15 PM
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aslan aslan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QFIT View Post
IMHO, the secret of a good tomato sauce is not based on proportions. As was said earlier, don’t get carried away with spices. Or even herbs. I don’t even use basil. Start with aromatics (what the French call mirepoix as stated in another thread). Simply onion, carrots and celery and a touch of garlic. (Shallot if you wish.) In this case, cooked very lightly and slowly, and never browned. Hazan used to say a couple tablespoons. I used a cup. She then published a newer book greatly increasing the quantities. I don’t know if it was an err in the original book, or a nod to modern cooking. But, the aromatic vegs are better in tomato sauces than throwing in heavier Provence herbs (which I adore on chicken), and spices are simply not required.

Of course everyone has different tastes. I adore the Northern Italian subtleties. As well as their Ferraris, Lamborghinis and Maseratis.
Ferraris, Lamborghinis and Maseratis are not limited only to Italians of the Northern Provinces. Southerners don't all drive around in Fiats.

I have an Italian friend from "the south" who uses no basil in some of his sauces, however, he indulges heavily in oregano and double the amount of garlic that most recipes usually call for. You won't find as many red sauces from the northern regions, but they're all good. There is great variety among foods from north to south, and even among red sauces. When I finish this diet, I think I'll sample them all.

If you like the subtleties of northern Italy, you probably like French cuisine even more. I'm not crazy about American versions of "northern Italian dishes." But that might be because I don't frequent expensive restaurants.
  #10  
Old December 9th, 2011, 05:01 AM
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QFIT QFIT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aslan View Post
Ferraris, Lamborghinis and Maseratis are not limited only to Italians of the Northern Provinces. Southerners don't all drive around in Fiats.

I have an Italian friend from "the south" who uses no basil in some of his sauces, however, he indulges heavily in oregano and double the amount of garlic that most recipes usually call for. You won't find as many red sauces from the northern regions, but they're all good. There is great variety among foods from north to south, and even among red sauces. When I finish this diet, I think I'll sample them all.

If you like the subtleties of northern Italy, you probably like French cuisine even more. I'm not crazy about American versions of "northern Italian dishes." But that might be because I don't frequent expensive restaurants.
Yeah, but the exoticars are manufactured in the North. And they throw stones at them in the South.

And yes, I adore French cuisine.
 

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