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  #11  
Old December 9th, 2011, 08:42 AM
Baberuth Baberuth is offline
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Default AP of sauce

The owner of real sauce is like an AP. He will listen to others preach their style with conviction and know it’s no use to even give them the basics to help them a little (actually a lot).

I plan on trying your suggestions. Don’t be fooled thinking a professional chef can make sauce as good as someone who has made it for several lifetimes every Sunday. A sauce that has been tweaked for generations. A sauce that makes the best meal of your life EVERY Sunday.

For lasagna use your meats out of the sauce (pork, sausage and meatballs). Do not use browned ground beef. If you want details send PM.

When and if you have tried this out, let me know what you think. Many of you are ahead of me with BJ experience, but I am the AP of sauce. When you try it, you will see why.
  #12  
Old December 9th, 2011, 08:57 AM
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QFIT QFIT is offline
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I’m very fond of the Southern Italian Lasagna, and yours could be the best. I also like Northern styles, like a Quattro Formaggi with no meat at all, or lasagna Bolognese made with a combination of Bolognese and béchamel sauce. Béchamel is a French name, but its origin is Italian. Of course the Bolognese can contain ground pork. Unfortunately, it takes six or seven hours to make lasagna Bolognese. But that is better than making a cassoulet, which takes three days.

Last edited by QFIT; December 9th, 2011 at 08:59 AM.
  #13  
Old December 10th, 2011, 11:33 AM
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aslan aslan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QFIT View Post
Yeah, but the exoticars are manufactured in the North. And they throw stones at them in the South.

And yes, I adore French cuisine.
I am partial to French cuisine, as well, When I first got married, my wife attended a French culinary school on weekends. She made each and every dish she learned for me at home, but only once! She said the work that went into each dish was just too much to repeat. I can still taste her lobster bisque, which took hours to prepare and which I have never seen equalled in all these years, And escargot, which her chef recommended never to have outside the home, unless you know and trust the restaurant very much, since they have a habit of reusing the shells and not always in the most sanitary manner. For those who avoid French restaurants because of the cost, they just don't understand the work that goes into fine French cooking. And mercifully the portion tend to be smaller than American fare, or no telling how many additional belt sizes I would have gained over the years. The only criticism I have of French cooking is that you need to keep the salt shaker out of the hands of many a French chef.

Last edited by aslan; December 10th, 2011 at 10:52 PM.
  #14  
Old December 10th, 2011, 11:50 AM
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QFIT QFIT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aslan View Post
I am partial to French cuisine, as well, When I first got married, my wife attended a French culinary school on weekends. She made each and every dish she learned for me at home, but only once! She said the work that went into each dish was just too much to repeat. I can still taste her lobster bisque, which took hours to prepare and which I have never seen equalled in all these years, And escargot, which her chef recommended never to have outside the home, unless you know and trust the restaurant very much, since they have a habit of reusing the shells and not always in the most sanitary manner. For those who avoid French restaurants because of the cost, they just don't understand the work that goes into fine French cooking. And mercifuly the portion tend to be smaller than American fare, or no telling how many additional belt sizes I would have gained over the years. The only criticism I have of French cooking is that you need to keep the salt shaker out of the hands of many a French chef.
Lobster bisque is one of my favorites. Horrible pain to make. First, I hate killing the lobsters. Second, getting the meat out is a pain. Third, I try to get out all of the flavor with a food mill, which is difficult to use even without the shells.

The French still use cream and butter, and yet are thinner and live longer. As you say, the small portions are key --- and the wine -- and they eat in a liesurely fashion, not stuffing everything they can fit in their mouths at once.
 

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