Can Someone Please Explain

  • cosmarchy

    Can Someone Please Explain

    I’m quite new to this sort of thing, so i’m hoping someone can explain something quite peculiar to me.

    I have been watching live blackjack to try and get the lay of the land before betting.

    Before the dealer physically deals the cards, the electronic cards appear on the screen in their appropriate places. The dealer then waits for the users response and again before she deals the cards, the electronic ones appear on the screen.

    Does this not imply the software they are using already knows the cards and their order on the table and is pre-empting the dealer to hit or not. If this is the case how is this fair – it is no longer a game of luck.

    What have I got wrong?

  • London Colin

     

    The cards are passed over a detector as they come out of the shoe. The information about their identity is sent to your PC, and the ‘electronic’ cards are displayed.

    The video feed often lags behind the data feed a little, making it look like the computer is predicting the future.

  • cosmarchy

     

    Quote: London Colin said:
    The cards are passed over a detector as they come out of the shoe. The information about their identity is sent to your PC, and the ‘electronic’ cards are displayed.

    The video feed often lags behind the data feed a little, making it look like the computer is predicting the future.

    Thanks for sorting that one out – I knew there had to be a logical explanation!!

    Another thought occurs…when playing RNG blackjack, it is limited to an 8 card pack as if it was being played with physical cards? Does it even matter I wonder?

  • Wookets

     

    In computer programs, what you actually see isn’t always perfectly synchronized with the logical operations running behind the scenes. This is even more evident on the Internet when latency is introduced by connection speeds. An example of this is prevalent in many of today’s first person shooter games. On your screen, you see tracers of the bullets go from point A to point B over time, but in most games, bullets travel instantaneously from point A to point B because that’s what’s actually programmed. The tracers are merely for visual effect and don’t represent the true behavior of the bullets.

    As per online BJ, I do believe that the cards are continuously shuffled, implying a near infinite number of decks.

  • MangoJ

     

    Quote: Wookets said:
    As per online BJ, I do believe that the cards are continuously shuffled, implying an infinite number of decks.

    So you got dealt the same card twice ? There is a difference between continuous shuffle and infinite deck.

  • Wookets

     

    Quote: MangoJ said:
    So you got dealt the same card twice ? There is a difference between continuous shuffle and infinite deck.

    Well, I guess it’s not infinite, but it’s far more than 8. Is that fair?

  • Gamblor

     

    Quote: Wookets said:
    In computer programs, what you actually see isn’t always perfectly synchronized with the logical operations running behind the scenes. This is even more evident on the Internet when latency is introduced by connection speeds. An example of this is prevalent in many of today’s first person shooter games. On your screen, you see tracers of the bullets go from point A to point B over time, but in most games, bullets travel instantaneously from point A to point B because that’s what’s actually programmed. The tracers are merely for visual effect and don’t represent the true behavior of the bullets.

    As per online BJ, I do believe that the cards are continuously shuffled, implying a near infinite number of decks.

    Also in multiplayer shooter games, the game client extrapolates and projects the other players position. With a really good connection, the client and server can interact about 20 times per second (lets say every 40 ms, so furthermore there is an 80 ms delay from the other clients move to server, to your client). A good screen refresh rate, is about 60 times a second. So the client has to project the other players position a bit, normally you don’t notice, since its only a fraction of a second. If the client connection is slow enough, this would explain “lag” (the client projected the wrong position of the other player, and updates the other positions with the delayed update), and why when you shoot other characters, they sometimes die after they run behind a wall.

    Has nothing to do with blackjack

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